Ships Next Business Day (M-F)

Blood. Sweat. Years.

by Andy Roy May 03, 2019 1 Comment

Blood. Sweat. Years.

Ten years ago on May 1 2009, a Friday of course, at about 3 pm I was called into my bosses office at CAB Incorporated. They laid me off. I knew it was coming, but let me tell you that every layoff is a kick in the nuts. There were no jobs to be had for electrical engineers in our area, and Leah you will remember has always had the better career anyway. (She's a better cut of human than I am, and as such is way more employable.) We were not going to move for me to chase a job. So I decided to go full time with my two year old hobby at Fiddleback Forge.

Now I have worked hard, but the real credit for me making ten years as a full time knifemaker goes to y'all. The people I have met through this [career] have been like family to me. Many of you have traveled to come to events with us here, and we literally love you like family. So I wanted to than you all for your success at making Fiddleback Forge an acceptable carreer to my wife. Without her, and y'all there would be no Fiddleback Forge. I am forever indebted to all of you.

Thank you.

Fiddleback Forge circa 2009

10 years and 1 week ago...I finished these knives. One week prior to going full time.

Fiddleback Forge circa 2009

Fiddleback Forge circa 2009

Fiddleback Forge circa 2009

Fiddleback Forge circa 2009

Fiddleback Forge circa 2009

Scroll through today's Fiddleback Friday previews and hopefully you'll notice a few improvements over the years.

https://fiddlebackforge.com/blogs/news/fiddleback-friday-5-3-19




Andy Roy
Andy Roy

Author

Andy is the President of Fiddleback Forge, as well as the head knife-maker. He started making knives in 2007, before going full time in 2009. He still provides all the finish grinds and shaping to every handmade Fiddleback Forge knife made.



1 Response

Brian Griffin
Brian Griffin

July 04, 2019

I can notice a few improvements yes, but I still love the look of those old two-tone wooden handles you used to do in the early years.

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