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Fiddleback Forge Bushcrafter, As Featured in Gumption Gear Review

by Robert Gilbert September 19, 2018

Fiddleback Forge Bushcrafter, As Featured in Gumption Gear Review

Gumption Gear Review

Gumption Gear Review featured the Fiddleback Forge Bushcrafter in their "Bushcraft Revisited: Eight Elite Options for 2018" article. It's a beautifully written piece on Bushcraft knives and their intended purpose.

Here's a couple of excerpts from the article:

The Value of Bushcraft…
Boiled down to its essence, “Bushcraft” is a group of related skills that help you survive and adapt to overcome obstacles in the outdoors. It’s about sustainability and self-sufficiency, living comfortably within a natural environment.  There’s an easy elegance to bushcraft – a beauty that comes from utilizing the material that nature provides rather than carrying everything on your back. Whether you adopt bushcraft as a lifestyle, sport or hobby, the fundamental requirement is a tool capable of tackling tasks that span the gamut from making fire to crafting shelter.

From our perspective, the true beauty of this genre is simply this: You don’t have to be a survivalist to benefit from a bushcraft styled blade. Despite continued growth in this product category, the premise of a good bushcraft knife remains the same, it’s the ultimate outdoor utility tool designed for those who take the road less traveled and come back better for it. So even if you haven’t adopted a bushcraft lifestyle, backpackers, adventurers and outdoor enthusiasts alike can benefit from the wide range of competency and versatility these knives offer.

...

Fiddleback Forge: Bushcrafter
From the trademarked “Bullseye Lanyard Tubes”, 3D spalted steel flats, and unique Micarta knife pin patterns, your Fiddleback will always stand out from the crowd. But this knife is more than just striking aesthetics. Like all of Andy Roy’s creations, this knife looks good and works harder. The blade design make it great for drilling tasks, as well as other common bushcrafting chores. A convex grind makes for a smoother cutting (increasing controllability due to the more gradual shift in geometry) but also reduces the amount of material that must be displaced by the blade as it passes through the cutting medium. In layman’s terms, your cuts require less energy, and your edge stays crisp and sharp. Trust us, this tool goes from chopping and batoning, to kitchen work without flinching.  Whether you’re making tent stakes, fuzz sticks or just whittling, the Fiddleback Forge Bushcrafter proves time and again that it’s not only elegant, but eager for a life of daunting endeavors.

Go read the whole article on the Gumption Gear Review website: 
http://www.gogumption.com/go-hike/bushcraft-revisited-eight-elite-options-for-2018/

Gumption Gear Review: Fiddleback Forge Bushcrafter




Robert Gilbert
Robert Gilbert

Author

Robert Gilbert heads up the team at Fiddleback Outpost, which in turn handles website design & management, social media, customer service, fulfillment, sales, and marketing for Fiddleback Forge.



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