Get a Grip - Pro Tips on How to Shape a Knife Handle

by Andy Roy April 14, 2020 1 Comment

Get a Grip - Pro Tips on How to Shape a Knife Handle

Pro Tips for Properly Shaping the Interface Between Flesh and Steel

When I started making knives, I got a ton of support from the community – and nobody was as surprised by this as I was. At the time I had very little metalworking experience. Although, I had built some furniture, done some carving and refinished teak on sailboats, so I had a little experience working with wood. 

By 2007 I had sold my sixth knife. Actually, it was one of a batch of six knives – I sold 5 and gifted one to a soldier who was serving in Iraq. These knives were so ugly that, looking back, I am still shocked anyone wanted them – I think the handles were the selling point. Even though those early handles were ugly, I think I was onto something.

THE MAKINGS OF A GOOD HANDLE

Early on I had a few vague ideas of what would make a good handle. I have always believed that knives need feminine looking curves to be sexy. To this day I still don’t like bumpy, humpy looking shapes, with jutty, manish looking features. 

The beauty of your handle only enhances the overall aesthetics of a well-crafted knife. Photo: Fiddleback Forge

I also knew that the hand likes to grip a knife handle that is fatter at the spine side and tapers toward the edge side. This gives the cross-section profile – on a good handle – a kind of egg shape. In addition to comfort, this egg shape properly indexes the handle in the hand. A user should be able to feel where the sharp parts are without having to check visually.

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Andy Roy
Andy Roy

Author

Andy is the President of Fiddleback Forge, as well as the head knife-maker. He started making knives in 2007, before going full time in 2009. He still provides all the finish grinds and shaping to every handmade Fiddleback Forge knife made.



1 Response

Boaz Rogan
Boaz Rogan

April 15, 2020

Enjoyed the reading love the designs.

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