Why Fillet?

by Brian Griffin March 18, 2020

Why Fillet?

One cold day in February, my daughter came in from school while I was filleting some Branzini for our dinner. As per her habit, she just quietly watched me work for a few minutes to take in what I was doing, but there soon came the usual questions. Staring with, “why do you do that sometimes, and take out the bones like that, but then not at other times?” 


Naturally the filleting stopped and the next few minutes were spent answering her questions. The statement about removing the bones sometimes but not at others was the first thing I needed to address for her to understand what I was doing and why. I pointed out that she had never seen me fillet smaller trout, that I pretty much always just remove their heads and either pan fry them whole or broil them whole. To which she replied yes, and commented that she really likes eating the crunchy skin and tails that way, just as I had done as a kid.


Then I had her look closer at the Branzini, and asked her if she noticed anything different about their skin compared to the Trout and Salmon? She said, “well yes I do. These fish look and feel like they have a coat of armor over their skin.” And I said “yes, precisely. In the water that is exactly what these scales, speaking as I removed a few to show her,  are for them. They form a layer of armor as a defense against predation. It makes these fish harder for their predators to eat, including us humans. I can easily eat around the fishes bones, but scaling fish can be a really messy task that I prefer to not do indoors.”


Then, when I went to cut off the last fillet, she paid more attention to each of the steps. She watched with more interest how I made the first cut just behind the pectoral fin, cutting straight down to the spine and then turning the edge toward the tail. She noted how after I had made the cut all the way down to the tail, that I flipped the fillet over but left the skin attached at the tail, and asked why I did that. The answer of course is because it allows one to hold onto the skin better, for more control, as the meat is separated from it. She watched very closely as I sliced the knife between the the meat and the skin, and saw how by pressing the knife down flat against the skin all it takes is a gentle back and forth slicing motion while cutting forward to cut the meat off the skin with very little effort. And then she saw how once the skin is separated we had nice clean fish fillets, with no skin and no scales.


These small fillets still include the rib bones, which I would normally remove from fillets of larger fish with more meat on them, however; that's material for another article on filleting some time in the future. There are a few different reasons for filleting fish, and this is just one of them. On smaller fish like these I prefer to not lose any more meat, and just pick out these few bones whilst eating after they're cooked. This way the eating can come sooner, and with less stress as well. Just by forgoing both the hassle of scraping off the scales, and then having to clean up the mess that makes afterward.

Life is short, and the older we get the faster the time flies by. Fortunately for us we do get to choose some of the battles we fight along the way. With my busy schedule as a single parent, I'd simply rather spend five minutes filleting, and only lose a thin slice of each fish barely thicker than it's bones, than lose an entire hour of my life scaling the fish and then doing the clean up afterwards.  




Brian Griffin
Brian Griffin

Author

Brian Griffin is an author, photographer, wilderness and survival skills teacher, knife enthusiast, outdoor gear researcher and product development consultant. He has a decades-long history of using and developing outdoor related tools and gear.



Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Articles

Antifreeze
Antifreeze

by Brian Griffin December 02, 2020 2 Comments

I'm going to preface this piece by saying some methods of preventing cold weather injuries and surviving subfreezing temperatures can be hazardous to ones health if proper precautions for the specific methods aren't taken. However cold weather, and cold weather injuries, can be just as deadly. Neither should be taken lightly or approached in a cavalier manner. Having experienced both hypothermia and frostbite myself, and having seen up close people who had died of hypothermia, this is something I can attest to personally.

Read More

An Epic Northeast “Surf and Turf” Week
An Epic Northeast “Surf and Turf” Week

by Kevin Estela November 18, 2020

The term “surf and turf” usually relates to a dinner entree consisting of one protein from the land and one from the sea. Most of the time, this means steak and lobster or some form of red meat and shellfish or crustacean. If you’re looking to dine out on the frugal side, this menu item is usually on the other far side of the menu. I’m going to take some liberty with the term “surf and turf” and extend “surf” to the rivers and tributaries of the great lakes for the purpose of this monthly blog. I’m writing this and I get to set the rules. Trust me, this story is going to be worth bending the terms. You see, I’ve just had an epic week of hunting and fishing so this article for Fiddleback Forge was certainly going to include the amazing bow hunting experience in Kent, Connecticut and catching monster fish in Albion, New York. Granted, the cost of the gear and travel to get these menu items is far from frugal but the taste is priceless.  

Read More

A Pocket Contingency Kit
A Pocket Contingency Kit

by Brian Griffin November 11, 2020 3 Comments

I've received requests for more information on the small pocket emergency kit that appears in my articles now and then. Some want to know more about it; how it developed and what it contains, so I thought I'd dedicate this article to it. 

My work takes me to some interesting areas, especially lately. Some  are more questionable than others, and it's usually late night or early morning prior to sunrise. To avoid disruptions and distractions I try to not draw attention. I try to just blend in with the environment, go gray so to speak and be uninteresting, but be prepared for mishaps knowing some could be life or death depending on environment and/or season. So these little kits have developed to contain a variety of contingency items, chosen based on their likelihood of use at the time and place, and still discretely disappear into a pouch or cargo pocket until needed.

Read More

Knives & News

Sign up with your favorite email.